Courses

Below you will find the current course offerings listed by semester and then alphabetically by department. Students and Faculty should log in to workday.simmons.edu and view the live course listings for the current semester. The current semester listings below are updated weekly. If you have any questions about these courses, please contact the Registrar's Office at or 617-521-2111.

Summer 2022 Course Schedule

Last Updated: 10/04/2022 10:04PM

Learn. Comm. Integ. Sem.

LCIS 201 - Learning Community Integrated Seminar

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/06/15 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 5:50PM
Denise Carroll
2
TBD

Library Science

LIS 404 - Principles of Management

Designed to acquaint students with the basic management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The course is intended to help provide understanding of human interactions in the workplace and develop the practical problem-solving skills needed to handle managerial problems professionally. Approaches to managing, from authoritarian to participative to laissez-faire, are examined. Readings, case studies, critical incidents, simulations, and discussions.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Lisa Hussey
3
TBD

LIS 407 - Information Sources and Services

This course focuses on topics related to services, information sources and information seeking processes as manifested in a variety of information centers. Introduces information concepts and services, including: question-negotiation (the reference interview), customer service, ethics, evaluating the collection, management, user service philosophy, service in different institutional settings and for diverse populations, and the assessment of services. Students learn about the creation, packaging, access and presentation of information in different types of sources and formats.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Eric Poulin
3
TBD

LIS 430 - Business Information Sources and Services

A survey of print and electronic information sources as well as coverage of basic business concepts is provided. It will include sources basic to business, finance, trade, company and industry reference and be both national and international in scope. The objective will be to familiarize students with source material including government sources and statistics, industry and trade literature, used for business research. Attention will also be paid to the information needs of business people and researchers as well as the issues and concerns associated with business information gathering and research.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Linda Schuller
3
TBD

LIS 439 - Preservation Management

This course covers the fundamentals of planning and managing programs of prevention and remedial treatment for the preservation of information resources in libraries and archives. The study of the nature of all types of materials and the factors contributing to their deterioration serves as background. Preservation planning topics, such as environmental control and light, security, risk management, fire prevention, housekeeping and storage, general collections maintenance and testing methods, are covered. Additional topics include: emergency planning in the areas of preparedness, mitigation and response; selection of materials for basic repair, conservation or reformatting; budgeting for preservation activities; preservation training for staff and users; digital preservation; and cooperative programs. Course includes readings, guest lectures, media presentations, field trips, demonstrations, and individual projects.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Donia Conn
3
TBD

LIS 440 - Archival Access and Use

Explores access to and use of archives and manuscript collections within the framework of archival description and representation. How archives are described and the surrogates that are used to represent them profoundly impact their access and use and are central to the archives profession. Students will explore various types of archival use including exhibits (physical and virtual) in addition to the creation of surrogates for primary sources and will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of EAD (Encoded Archival Description) as well as other emerging metadata standards.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Katherine Wisser
3
TBD

LIS 447 - Collection Maintenance

This course in preservation management deals with the planning, implementation, and management of an effective collections maintenance program, including an effective repair program for a small/medium general collection. Topics include developing criteria for the selection of items in need of repair, binding, or replacement; learning the proper repair and housing techniques for bound and unbound materials in order to be able to administer an in-house repair program; selecting and processing materials for remote storage facilities; the cost factors involved in developing a collections maintenance program for general collections; and selecting and managing staff, space, equipment, and supplies for such a program. This course takes place at the North Bennett Street School.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/06/06 - 2022/06/15
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
9:00AM - 3:50PM
Donia Conn
3
TBD

LIS 453 - Collections Development and Management

Activities through which library collections are systematically developed and managed are explored, especially the formulation and implementation of written collection development policies. Other specific topics include identification of user needs; collection evaluation; fund allocation among competing departments, subjects, and/or media; selection methods; intellectual freedom; storage alternatives; and cooperative collection development. Course includes readings, guest lectures, and a term project in which a collection development policy for a real information agency is prepared.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Michael Leach
3
TBD

LIS 456 - Records Management

This course addresses the theories and methodologies associated with managing institutional records, both paper-based and electronic. It introduces the set of activities required for systematically controlling the creation, distribution, use, maintenance and disposition of recorded information maintained as evidence of business activities and transactions. With an emphasis on case studies, students will learn about records appraisal, scheduling and disposition, functional analysis and records management program implementation and policy. Prior experience working with institutional records and/or LIS438 is recommended.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Stephen Dalina
3
TBD

LIS 460 - Technology and the School Library Teacher

This course will prepare the school library teacher to successfully integrate new and emerging technologies into the school library program, technology lab, and classroom. Technologies studied will be appropriate for integration into all areas of the school's curriculum. Web-based and mobile resources and tools are used extensively throughout the course and are directly tied to current topics in successful school library management and practice. Hands-on learning and discussion of issues that could arise as a part of technology integration with pre-K - 12 students are foundational elements of the course. The role the school library teacher plays in the professional development of teachers in his/her school as a resource person, leader in technology instruction, facilitator, collaborator, and instructor will be discussed throughout the course. Meets Technology Requirement for students in the School Library Teacher Program.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Georgina Trebbe
3
TBD

LIS 475 - Organizational/Information Ethics

The course will examine the ethical implications of decisions made within various organizational contexts regarding issues such as property ownership, strategy formulation, the utilization of computer technology, employee relations, accountability, conflicts of interest, as well as other topics relevant to today's managers. Participants will examine the ethical implications of cases at the individual, organizational, and societal levels. The course will assist professionals to clarify and apply their own moral standards and ethical norms, beliefs, and values to unfamiliar, complex situations in which the appropriate application of these values may not be obvious. The course makes no effort to dictate what is "right," "proper," and "just"; that is left to the individual's own moral standards of behavior and ethical systems of belief.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Rachel Williams
3
TBD

LIS 476 - Outreach and Advocacy for Cultural Heritage

Outreach and advocacy are critical components of successful archives and cultural heritage programs, encompassing broad areas of user concerns from digital exhibits to educational programs, to social responsibility. Students explore the principles of outreach as well as strategies for identifying partners and the needs of diverse user populations. They learn how to develop public and educational programs including exhibits, and publicity and marketing tools for many audiences. Students also examine professional ethics and core values of advocacy and social responsibility in national and international settings.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Sarah Pratt Martin
3
TBD

LIS 477 - Digital Asset Management for Libraries, Archives and Museums

Discusses digital asset management for libraries, archives, and museums.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Jeffrey Pomerantz
3
TBD

LIS 481 - Library Collections and Materials for Children

This course addresses the evaluation, selection, and organization of materials for children (ages 0 - 12) in public and school library collections. Students will become familiar with materials for children in various formats, including the picture book, easy reader, transitional book, and chapter book; and will attend to fiction and nonfiction published to meet young people's recreational and curricular reading and information needs and interests. This course places strong emphasis on the evaluation of both individual items and library collections of children's material as well as on the selection of material for children for the purposes of collection development.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/06/07 - 2022/08/09
Tuesday
6:00PM - 8:50PM
Melanie Kimball
3
TBD

LIS 483 - Library Collections and Materials for Young Adults

This course addresses the evaluation, selection, and organization of materials for young adults (young people ages 12 - 18) in public and school library collections. Students will become familiar with materials for young adults in various formats and genres, including traditional and graphic novels, and will attend to fiction and nonfiction published to meet young adults' recreational and curricular reading and information needs and interests. This course places strong emphasis on the evaluation of both individual items and library collections of young adult material as well as on the selection of material for young adults for the purposes of collection development.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/06/08 - 2022/08/10
Wednesday
6:00PM - 8:50PM
Melanie Kimball
3
TBD

LIS 485 - Introduction to Programming

Introduces computer science and programming using a high-level programming language (currently Python). Teaches program design in the context of contemporary practices both object oriented and procedural. Presents fundamental computer science topics through initiation and design of programs. Students learn to think logically and to apply this thinking to debugging computer programs.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Sarah Allwarden
3
TBD

LIS 488 - Technology for Information Professionals

This course provides the conceptual foundation and context of computing, Internet and related technologies as used in information-intensive professions. With an emphasis both on concepts (along with an emphasis on terminology that appears in the professional literature) and skills (interactive demos and/or hands-on sessions), the course encourages students in trying out and learning new pieces of technology. The course provides an overview of topics such as how computers work (hardware, software, history of IT); networking; internet, related technologies and the future of WWW; content management systems; RDBMS and XML; ethics; security; information search and retrieval; the impact and implications of technological change on libraries, archives and other information centers; technology today and tomorrow; and other related topics. Along with providing the general technology foundation needed before taking other technology courses offered at SLIS, this course also introduces some of these other courses. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course early in their course program.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Naresh Agarwal
3
TBD

LIS 490 - International and Comparative Librarianship

Comparison of American and foreign library systems in terms of national differences in philosophy, objectives, and services. Evaluation and comparison of collection policies, technical processes, public services, professional training, management, and facilities. Selected in-depth area studies. International cooperation and major projects in the information fields; contributions of international organizations. Guest lectures, presentations, and individual research projects.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Lisa Hussey
3
TBD

LIS 500

The independent study program provides an opportunity for the student with a distinguished academic record, who has achieved degree candidacy, to pursue an individual topic related to his/her own interests for use in a substantial paper or project. A faculty member guides and advises the student in conferences, reviews preliminary drafts, and assigns the final grade. Academic credit is dependent upon substantial accomplishment at a distinguished level of quality. Members of the faculty actively encourage publication of those completed seminar studies that represent useful contributions to professional literature. The study proposal must be initiated by the student at least eight weeks before the semester in which it is to be undertaken. The student bears responsibility for formulating the study, approaching an appropriate faculty member, securing his/her consent to act as a sponsor, and submitting a full written statement outlining the study to that sponsor at least four weeks before the semester opens. Ask your advisor for instructions and Independent Study proposal forms.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location

Research Data Mangement at the HMS Countway Library

01 TBD TBD
Danielle Maurici-Pollock
3
TBD

Middle School Digital Media Literacy Curriculum Unit

OL TBD TBD
Lisa Hussey
3
TBD

LIS 505M - Government Archives

This special topics course focuses on the specific settings, requirements, opportunities and challenges faced by organizations charged with the collection, preservation, access and retention of records created through the activity of governing. Starting from the notion of a "record' as it applies in a government context, this course explores the unique legal, social and ethical responsibilities of government archives. It investigates the imperative of the appraisal, preservation and access to those records in a democratic society. Government archives represent a key category of archival institutions that confront the tensions between access and recordkeeping, and this course explores traditional archival functions, using the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) as a point of analysis. In addition, the course will look at the challenges faced by State Archives as well as municipalities or towns. Prerequisite: LIS 438 Topics covered will include the relationship and development of legislation and record keeping, the impact that that legislation can have on the mission of government, and the public's understanding and expectations of the institution. While the course primarily focuses on government agencies in a U.S. context, international government archives will be explored.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/06/21 - 2022/08/04
Tuesday, Thursday
4:00PM - 5:20PM
Katherine Wisser
3
TBD

LIS 505W - Special Topics - WISE

The development of archival theory and practice has brought contributions from around the world. In addition, contemporary issues related to access, accountability, and memory offer plenty of examples and discussions from international archival contexts. This course introduces students to a diverse number of archival issues analyzed from an international perspective. Topics include historical developments of theory and practice in Archives and Records Management, archival solidarity, social justice, standards, and community archives. Students analyze these topics within the transnational environment offered by the collaboration between the School of Library and Information Science and the Department of Information Studies at University College London.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Katherine Wisser
3
TBD

LIS 512 - Advanced Field Experience in Library and Information Science

This course is a focused field experience combined with a related academic components. The field experience involves a minimum of 130 hours in an LIS setting and approximately 20 hours of coursework completed online. As a 3-credit course, it has a significant hands-on learning component. Through discussion with key personnel in the organization and working under professional supervision, the student gains hands-on experience in the information environment. Examples of coursework include: readings; discussion forums; reflections or journal entries; and/or examples of field work. Prerequisite: 18 credit hours including all SLIS core and concentration requirements.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Sarah Pratt Martin
3
TBD

LIS 601

Independent Study offers an opportunity for the doctoral student to pursue individual study related to aspects of management not covered in detail in the regular course offerings. Independent Study may be a reading course, a group investigation of a topic of mutual interest, or a directed research project. An end result will be an oral presentation to the faculty supervisor and the Committee on Doctoral Studies, as well as a possible paper of publishable quality.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location

The Principals' Perceptions of School Libraries

OL1 TBD TBD
Kyong Eun Oh
3
TBD

Academic Librarians Data Literacy Competency

OL2 TBD TBD
Rong Tang
3
TBD

Information Encountering & Personal Productivity

OL3 TBD TBD
Sanda Erdelez
6
TBD
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