Courses

Below you will find the current course offerings listed by semester and then alphabetically by department. Students and Faculty should log in to workday.simmons.edu and view the live course listings for the current semester. The current semester listings below are updated weekly. If you have any questions about these courses, please contact the Registrar's Office at or 617-521-2111.

Summer 2022 Course Schedule

Last Updated: 11/28/2022 08:04PM

Simmons Course

SIM 201 - Simmons: Experience

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/06/08 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
3:00PM - 3:50PM
Sarah Cavanagh
1
TBD

SIM 301 - Simmons: Excel

In the final segment of The Simmons Course, you will join other students in your major to focus on career, financial and life planning, considering internships, research, and service, employment and graduate school.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Marda Messay
1
TBD

Sociology

SOCI 239 - Introduction to Social Research I

Introduces methods and strategies used in research in the social sciences. Teaches responsible consumption of social science research and presents the logic and skills of social research methods. Emphasizes the nature of inquiry and the relationship between theory and research. Includes social research ethics and an introduction to data analysis using computers in research. Previous courses in statistics or computers not required. Instructor consent required.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/22
Monday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Carolyn Rodgers
4
TBD
OL 2022/05/17 - 2022/06/28
Tuesday, Thursday
11:00AM - 1:50PM
Carolyn Rodgers
4
TBD

SOCI 241 - Health, Illness & Society

Emphasizes social determinants of physical and mental health and cross-cultural experiences of illness and seeking care. Pays special attention to the unequal distribution of health and illness in the U.S, the role of culture in our understandings of health and illness, and the social organization of health care.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/05/18 - 2022/06/27
Monday, Wednesday
11:00AM - 1:50PM
Charlotte Powley
4
TBD

SOCI 245 - Global Health

Examines health and illness from a global perspective. Current public health dilemmas are analyzed, highlighting the role of colonialism, culture, development, and public health policies. Case studies will focus on how health issues are handled in different parts of the world, highlighting the roles of culture and political economy.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/05/19 - 2022/06/28
Tuesday, Thursday
8:00AM - 10:50AM
Elise Brenner
4
TBD

Special Needs Educ

SPND 400DL - Digital Literacy Modules

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Janet Chumley
TBD
TBD

SPND 420 - Introduction to Assistive Technology

The purpose of this course is to strengthen the preparation of teachers of students with severe and moderate disabilities to enable them to teach PreK-12 learners who are nonverbal, have limited speech, and may or may not already use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Assistive Technology (AT). Acknowledging the critical role of special educators in educating students who use AAC/AT in identifying students who might benefit from such systems, the Massachusetts legislature enacted a law to ensure that special education teachers acquire specific knowledge and skills in this area.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/07/07 - 2022/08/04
Thursday
6:00PM - 9:00PM
Jennifer Edge-Savage
2
TBD

SPND 443 - Special Education Laws, Regulations, and Process for Teachers

Focuses on the historical, philosophical, legal, and ethical perspectives of educational services for learners with special needs. Reviews exemplary programs, relevant current literature, state and federal laws, development of an IEP, and case studies.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
04BL 2022/05/17 - 2022/06/28
Tuesday
5:00PM - 7:00PM
Allan Blume
4
TBD
06BL 2022/05/18 - 2022/06/29
Wednesday
5:00PM - 7:00PM
Allan Blume
4
New England Center for Children Campus

SPND 444 - Special Education Laws & Regulations For Teachers & Administrators

Offers an examination of the historical, philosophical, legal and ethical perspectives of educational services for learners with special needs. Reviews the statutory and regulatory foundations pertaining to children and youth with disabilities. Key judicial interpretations of those policies will also be reviewed. Students are not required to have a background in law.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/31 - 2022/06/16
Tuesday, Thursday
5:30PM - 8:50PM
Martha Wall
2
Main Campus

SPND 445 - The Individualized Education Program: Strategies for Development, Interpretation, and Implementation

Offers an examination of the legal requirements as well as the process for the development, implementation and interpretation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP forms the basis for the provision of specially designed instruction to students with special needs who are eligible for special education under the provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Analysis of IEP meeting procedures and protocols are also integral to this course.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/06/21 - 2022/07/14
Tuesday, Thursday
5:30PM - 9:00PM
Martha Wall
2
TBD

SPND 448 - Analysis of Community Resources, Adult Service Agencies, and the Transition Process

Examines employment opportunities and support services available to citizens with severe disabilities. Involves job inventories in local industry and analysis of the prerequisite skills in such areas as functional academics, language, hygiene, motor skills, interpersonal skills, transportation, and money management. Includes placement and supervision of learners in worksites.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
06BL 2022/05/18 - 2022/06/08
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:00PM
Lyndsey Nunes
2
New England Center for Children Campus

SPND 491 - Analysis of Behavior

This course is part of the Autism Specialization Program. SPND 491 encompasses the applied behavior analysis training sequence offered at the New England Center for Children.  This sequence is offered throughout the year. The course sequence also incorporates NECC orientation classes, a subsequent series of trainings in applied behavior analysis, online modules, and competency-based fieldwork with learners with autism as outlined below. The Behavioral Analytic Strategies for Teachers of Learners with Autism sequence covers topics such as defining behavior, data collection systems, matching-to-sample techniques, prompting, shaping, naturalistic teaching, and amongst other teaching procedures specific for learners with autism. Trainings are provided in a variety of formats, including lecture and discussion, enhanced instruction, and behavioral skills training.  Acquisition of skills is measured through successful completion of competencies, and mastery of verbal knowledge is measured through written tests. Field work required.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
05 TBD TBD
Jarrod Scalzo
4
New England Center for Children Campus

SPND 495 - Applied Autism Research Ii/Lab

This course builds on the content of Applied Autism Research I and Lab.  In this course, students will complete an empirical project based upon the principles of experimental design.  Each project will incorporate observation and measurement techniques, and students will learn how to summarize, analyze, interpret, and graphically display data.  Students will present a completed research project, in oral or poster format, to colleagues in the field of special education who are experienced in conducting research with learners with autism. Field work required.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
05BL 2022/05/17 - 2022/07/12
Tuesday
8:00AM - 11:00AM
Jonathan Seaver
4
New England Center for Children Campus
06BL 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
5:00PM - 8:00PM
Jessica Seaver
4
New England Center for Children Campus

Statistics

STAT 118 - Introductory Statistics

This is an introduction to statistics for everyone who needs to collect, describe, and draw inferences from data. We will discuss various sources of data (experiments, surveys, etc.), graphical and numerical descriptions of data, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for drawing inferences, and simple and multiple linear regression for making predictions. Students will become proficient in the use of R for these tasks.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Roberta Osborne
4
TBD
OL 2022/05/24 - 2022/07/07
Tuesday, Thursday
8:00AM - 10:50AM
Geoff Turner
4
TBD

Social Work

SW 101 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

Introduces students to the historical development of professional social work and social welfare and orients them to the purposes, values, and worldview of the profession. The evolution of contemporary social work, contributions of key historical figures and pioneers, role of influential social policies, and ways in which social workers have shaped the social service system are discussed. Finally, an overview of contemporary social work practice principles with an emphasis on social and economic justice is provided. This course includes a 40-hour service learning component.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:00PM - 9:20PM
Gordon Chinamasa
4
TBD

SW 200 - Social Welfare Policy

Examines the issues and problems that social workers confront and provides a framework for understanding and critically analyzing the impact of social welfare policies on individuals, groups, and society. Through an examination of historical and contemporary social welfare policies, students build the knowledge, values, and skills required for effective practice through policy development and reform, including the ability to engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well being.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
John Lloyd
4
TBD

SW 253 - Human Behavior in Social Environment

Human Behavior in the Social Environment allows students to participate in the in-depth study of the physical, psychological, social, and cultural forces impacting the growth and development of individuals within the context of their families, communities, and society. Students explore foundational theories necessary to an understanding of human growth and development and integrate information from biology, psychology, sociology, and social work. Using a life span approach, a social work strengths perspective, a social justice perspective, and a person-in-environment framework, Human Behavior in the Social Environment follows the human life span, covering the prenatal period through older adulthood and end of life.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/22
Monday
8:00PM - 9:20PM
Jennifer Meade
4
TBD

SW 255 - Interviewing and Documentation in Human Services

This course is designed to give students entering social service professions an introduction to interviewing skills that are needed in order to complete initial and follow-up interviews with clients. These skills include engagement, working with the client to identify the presenting concerns, and working with the client to assess their needs and strengths. The course begins by focusing on engagement and interviewing skills when working with individuals, families, groups, and community members. The focus then turns to documenting these social service encounters. Once initial interviewing skills have been honed, the course focuses on skills for Motivational Interviewing before ending the course with an introduction to assessment. Throughout the course, strengths-based practice, a social justice orientation, person-in-environment, and culturally humble stance will be taken when looking at engagement and assessment. Students will leave this course with an understanding of how to conduct an empowering and strengths-based initial interview with a client, whether that client is an individual, family, group, or a composition of community members.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:00PM - 9:20PM
Judy Han
4
TBD

SW 345 - Junior Field Experience Seminar

The Junior Field Experience and Seminar is designed for the junior social work student to integrate classroom learning with practical social work experience in an agency setting. The field experience requires students to participate in 100 hours of field experience throughout the semester. The weekly seminar assists students in relating social work concepts, theories, and generalist practice competencies learned in BSW courses to experiences in the field. The junior field experience is designed to expose students to the complexities of practice in community-based organizations in preparation for the Senior Field Experience. Multiple dimensions of competent social work practice will be explored across a range of agency and service contexts. Students will begin to utilize supervision, identify and analyze related policies, engage in research-informed-practice, incorporate social values and ethics, and apply theories of human behavior in the social environment to various contexts in community-based practice.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Eugenia Knight
4
TBD

SW 351 - Social Work Practice I: Introduction to Generalist Practice

The first in the Program's series of four practice courses for social work majors, this course is aimed at orienting students to social work practice by providing a firm framework of social work knowledge and values and specific foundational skills. Students examine the ways that research, social policy and programs, economic and political forces, social work history, and explanatory theoretical paradigms inform work with clients. An introduction to the social work generalist perspective, this course allows students to begin to develop a professional identity and the relationship-building, interviewing, and planned change skills necessary for work with client systems of all sizes. Students become grounded in the constructs which make the social work profession unique.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Jeremy Brown
4
TBD

SW 352 - Social Work Practice II: Work with Individuals and Families

The second in the Program's series of four practice courses, this course continues the integration of theory and practice and advances the development of the generalist knowledge, values, and skills required to intervene with individuals and families from engagement through termination. Students continue to solidify the helping techniques and processes introduced in the Social Work Practice I course. In addition, this course is taught concurrently with the 100-hour, semester-long junior social work field placement. Material from each student's field placement experience is integrated into the class through discussion.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/22
Monday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Kelli Kirshtein
4
TBD

SW 354 - Social Work Practice IV: Macro Social Work

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Rosa Cho
4
TBD

SW 370 - Social Work Field Placement I

The Social Work Field Placement and Seminar I (Fall) is designed for the senior social work student in order to integrate classroom learning with practical social work experience in an agency setting. Throughout the Fall semester, students participate in 16 hours of field placement per week toward completion of the 425-hour, year-long BSW senior field placement requirement. In addition, students meet once per week for a 1 hour and twenty minute, in-class field seminar led by the BSW Program Field Director. Through reflective discussion, weekly assignments, and major projects and papers, the Field Seminar focuses on the integration of theory and practice, building the student's professional social work identity, enhancing self- awareness skills, advancing practice competencies, and synthesizing field learning. All aspects of agency field work, including learning to work within the agency context, effectively using supervision, using research to inform practice, utilizing social work values and ethics in practice, and applying social work knowledge and skills with clients are addressed.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
CD 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:00PM - 7:20PM
Tiffany Pinckney
8
TBD

SW 404 - Social Welfare Policy

This course provides students with the necessary skills to analyze the social welfare policies, benefits, and services that create the context in which all social workers practice. Students will learn about current state and federal policies related to a range of social welfare concerns (e.g., poverty reduction, health, housing/homelessness, criminal justice, disability, child welfare, immigration), the evolution of these policies, and the socio political and economic environment that has influenced their development and implementation. Students will build upon what they learned in SW403 Macro Social Work: Social Policies, Communities and Organizations by delving more deeply into various policy analysis frameworks, the mechanics of conducting policy analysis, and the evaluation methods to determine a policy's impact and effectiveness. To appreciate the complexities, contradictions, strengths, and weaknesses of the American approach to social welfare, students will be encouraged to think critically about the role of economics, politics, ideologies, values, and alternate policy models in each of these areas. The roles of power and privilege in social welfare policy will be assessed as they pertain to equality, equitability, and discrimination based on identity and social location. Class discussion, readings, and assignments will underscore the reciprocal relationship between clinical social work practice and social welfare policy.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/01
Monday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Julie Bolduc Defilippo
3
Main Campus

SW 409 - Dynamics of Racism and Oppression

This course is an intensive examination of the dynamics of various forms of oppression in U.S. society. The selection of the oppression of racism is deliberate. Through the analysis of critical race theory and intersectionality, students will come to understand the reasoning for this initial emphasis. The course begins with an analysis of racism from structural, (social) psychological and applied perspectives. This approach frames the analysis of other forms of oppression. Types of oppression (sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.) are examined in relationship to sociopolitical and economic factors, and historical themes that continue into the present day are identified. The course will explore the costs of oppression to all individuals and its differential impact on individuals in dominant and subordinate positions. The importance of power and the dynamics of domination and subordination in all forms of oppression will be explored. Practice issues will be examined in relation to multi-level interventions (i.e., individual, group, organizational and institutional).

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/01
Monday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Cindy Gordon
3
Main Campus
02 2022/05/19 - 2022/07/14
Thursday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Katrina Huff-Larmond
3
Main Campus

SW 414 - Assessment and Diagnosis

This one semester course provides knowledge of the major categories of diagnoses for adults as formulated in DSM-5 and of theoretical perspectives in those categories. Attention is given to the dynamics of development and culture, and to the interrelationship among biological, psychological, and social/cultural systems that impact diagnosis. Focus will be on utilizing these elements in order to provide a comprehensive bio-psycho-social assessment. Treatments specifically related to these diagnoses will be noted.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/07/19
Tuesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Julie Glovin
3
Main Campus
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/07/19
Tuesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Jessie Quintero Johnson
3
Main Campus
03 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
8:00AM - 11:50AM
Kristin Erbetta
3
Main Campus
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Melanie Robinson Findlay
3
Main Campus
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/07/14
Thursday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Jill Ragusa
3
Main Campus

SW 418 - Crisis Intervention With Children and Adolescents

This course examines crisis intervention and treatment approaches for children and adolescents, with a particular emphasis on vulnerable populations. Since crisis intervention is an integral part of social work practice, this course aims to provide students with knowledge of contributing factors, theories and practice models which best inform crisis intervention in social work with children and adolescents. Students will use a systems-based framework in their analysis of crisis situations and become familiar with the skills necessary to implement effective techniques with children and adolescents. The course will provide students with the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills when working with crises, as well as examine policy issues, ethical issues, and the intersectionality of oppression and the implications of oppression and discrimination on crisis experiences and interventions. Further, students will develop an awareness of the importance of engaging in self-care practices that will support their well-being when working with crises.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/06/03 - 2022/06/12
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
8:00AM - 5:00PM
Kelly Pratt
3
TBD

SW 422 - Substance Use and Social Work

Social workers across all sectors of practice are faced with individuals, families, and communities that are significantly affected by substance use disorders. The focus of the class is on exploring the nature, etiology and treatment of substance use disorders and how they relate to social work practice. Set within a social justice framework, students critically analyze the intersections of substance use with racism and other forms of oppression. Ethical and legal frameworks for substance use treatment are identified and analyzed. Students explore the complex interactions of biological, psychological, and social causes and consequences of substance use, and learn how to develop a comprehensive, multidimensional biopsychosocial assessment. The class prepares students to develop knowledge of, and skills in, evidence-informed substance use prevention, education, and treatment with individuals, groups, families, organizations, and communities.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/01
Monday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
David O'Donnell
3
Main Campus
03 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
12:30PM - 4:20PM
Jeff Steen
3
Main Campus

SW 425 - Family Approaches

This course focuses on advanced ways to conceptualize, assess, and intervene in families. Modern and postmodern theories will be examined, practiced, and critiqued. Practice examples will include nontraditional and traditional families, and applications of family and systems theories to work with individuals and dyads will additionally be discussed. Developing one's own clinical voice and attending to ethnicity, class, and other social identities will be emphasized. Students are encouraged to bring case materials and to take full advantage of varied experiential learning techniques.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/07/19
Tuesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Meghan Vooris
3
Main Campus

SW 441 - Social Work Research

In this introductory course, students examine the research process as it applies to the specialized interests and needs of social work. Illustrations are chosen from the studies of social work practice. The course is designed to enable students to be critical consumers of research, to understand the principles and process of research and the evaluation of practice, to become familiar with ethical considerations when designing and implementing a project, and to be capable of participating in practice related research. Sections with some online class sessions are designated as "blended."

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Abbie Frost
3
Main Campus

SW 446B - Field Year I

Continuation of SW446A, weekly agency-based field placement which focuses on foundation social work skills. Students complete agency based assignments in addition to process recordings and assessments. SW446B section 01 is for students doing a 24 hour per week field placement SW446B section 02 is for students doing a 16 hour per week field placement. The field department must approve all 16 hour placements prior to a student registering.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Eugenia Knight
4
TBD

SW 447C - Field Year II

For MSW with Advanced standing students only.The goal of field education is to learn the application of theoretical concepts and social work principles and values learned in the classroom to clinical practice. Field education provides supervised learning of advanced practice skills with individuals, families and groups in a variety of clinical settings. This course section is for Advanced Standing students only in their summer semester of study.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Eugenia Knight
4
TBD

SW 448 - Social Work Practice with Sexual and Gender Minorities

This course is designed to help students develop foundational knowledge and skills for social work practice with sexual and gender minority populations. Students will utilize a multi-dimensional framework to critically analyze power, privilege, and oppression relative to LGBTQ+ populations. Grounded in a social justice perspective, the first few weeks of the course are designed to help students gain an understanding of relevant ethical principles and dilemmas; models of identity development across race, class, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, and historical period; health disparities and resilience; history of social work discourse related to LGBTQ+ populations; and basic principles for affirmative social work practice. Students will develop knowledge about the mutual influence of individuals, families, and institutional factors, including social policies and cultural factors. Students will learn basic skills for competent practice with LGBTQ+ populations over the life course, with a particular focus on engagement, assessment, and intervention. Specific areas of practice will be explored, including intimate partner violence, suicide risk, HIV/AIDS, and substance use disorders. Students will critically examine the values of the social work profession and reflect on their personal values for the purpose of raising self awareness and examining personal biases related to heterosexism, heteronormativity, transphobia, and cisnormativity.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/19 - 2022/07/14
Thursday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Greta Spoering
3
Main Campus

SW 461 - Best Practices in Group Work

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Kristine Dennery
3
Main Campus

SW 482 - Domestic Violence and Family Welfare

This is a clinical practice course with intimate partner violence in the context of family (broadly defined) life. Students will learn specific skills in identifying, assessing and intervening with and on behalf of family members where domestic violence is present. You will be encouraged to reflect on your own knowledge about families, violence, and systems responses to violence, both as family members and as helpers. We will consider the experiences of women and men in heterosexual and same-sex relationships as both victims and abusers, and of children living with domestic violence, attending carefully to community and cultural contexts. We will address legal issues and criminal justice system responses, child protective services, and health care system responses. We will discuss and research current controversies in the field of intimate violence.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Nathan Brewer
3
Main Campus

SW 483 - Cognitive Behavioral Approaches and Treatment

The object of this course is to provide a working knowledge of the basic principles and specific techniques of a contemporary multi-modal approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy with consideration of its integration with other therapeutic approaches. Issues presented include: substance abuse, anger, interpersonal relationships, stress, anxiety disorders, depression, personality disorders with an emphasis on borderline personality disorder and issues of affect regulation. Prerequisite is SW421A. This course meets the requirement for a clinical practice elective.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/19 - 2022/07/14
Thursday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Laura Stevens
3
Main Campus

SW 485 - Mindfulness and Social Work Practice

There is a growing interest in psychotherapists of all theoretical orientations, for information about "Mindfulness", the cultivation of intentional, present focused awareness. Mindfulness is a core healing process in psychotherapy and has become a significant influence on contemporary Psychotherapy over the past decade. It has been shown to be a key component in many empirically validated interventions like Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based cognitive therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy. In this course we will examine the application of mindfulness to a wide range of clinical populations and conditions as well as the current neuroscience findings of its effects and the history of its development in the west. The course will ask participants to participate in experiential exercises of mindfulness and meditation and practice what they've learned each week between classes. They will also be asked to embody mindfulness as they learn, ensuring the essential qualities of compassion for self and others in the learning.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/07/08 - 2022/07/24
Friday
9:00AM - 10:30AM

Saturday
9:00AM - 10:30AM

Sunday
9:00AM - 10:30AM
Kelli Kirshtein
3
TBD

SW 539 - Social Work in Schools

The course outlines the unique and demanding role that School Social Workers play in our public schools as the primary providers of mental health services, crisis intervention, teacher training and community and parent outreach. Students in this course will identify and explore critical issues related to School Social Work such as: confidentiality, school culture and climate, peer aggression, school violence and policies such as "No Child Left Behind." Students will learn to create and carry out school-based social work interventions. Students taking this course will be expected to participate in the learning process through discussions, interviews, intervention evaluations and case presentations. Prerequisite: SW421A. This course meets the requirement for a clinical practice elective.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/07/13
Wednesday
5:00PM - 8:50PM
Francis Kuehn
3
Main Campus

SW 624 - Intervention Research

This PhD-level course focuses on preparing advanced graduate students with the knowledge and skills needed to design and evaluate interventions that address social needs, problems, and conditions.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/05/19 - 2022/06/30
Thursday
9:00AM - 11:50AM
Mary Christensen
3
TBD

SW 635 - Qualitative Data Analysis

This course is designed to introduce students to the elements of qualitative research data analysis. It follows the course SW 654 which introduced the historical and philosophical foundations of qualitative research methodology, key research strategies in qualitative research and principles for research design in qualitative research. In this course you will deepen your understanding of these key research notions and develop hands-on understanding of techniques and tools used to conduct this research.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/05/19 - 2022/06/30
Thursday
9:00AM - 11:50AM
Meagan Pilar
3
TBD

SW 651 - Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis

This course presents the common descriptive and inferential statistical tests performed in applied research. Topics include: probability theory, normal & non-normal distributions, drawing inference with t-test, ANOVA, and correlation and regression. The emphasis of learning will be more on concepts and applications using IBM SPSS than on computations and statistical theory. This course will provide students with a strong foundation in basic statistical reasoning that will help them in more advanced courses.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL 2022/05/19 - 2022/06/30
Thursday
6:00PM - 7:20PM

Sunday
2:00PM - 4:50PM
Tae Kuen Kim
3
TBD

SW 681 - Dissertation Proposal Continuance

This continuance course is for doctoral students who have successfully passed the comprehensive exam and completed the publishable paper requirement. Doctoral students register for this continuance through the semester that they defend their dissertation proposal. Before registering, doctoral students must have the permission of the doctoral program director. This is a required continuance.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL01 TBD TBD
Michelle Putnam
TBD
TBD

SW 682 - Dissertation Continuance

This continuance course is for doctoral students who have successfully defended their dissertation proposal and are now working on their dissertation. Doctoral students register for this continuance through the semester that they defend their dissertation and apply for graduation. Before registering, doctoral students must have the permission of the doctoral program director. This is a required continuance.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Michelle Putnam
TBD
TBD

SW 691 - Doctoral Teaching Practicum

This practicum is for Social Work doctoral students and focuses on developing and applying pedagogical skills in a classroom setting at the School of Social Work. Before registering, doctoral students must have a signed teaching practicum agreement with the faculty member they will be working with. This is a required practicum.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Michelle Putnam
TBD
TBD

SW 692 - Doctoral Research Practicum

This practicum is for Social Work PhD students and focuses on developing and applying research skills while working on an active research study at the School of Social Work. Before registering, PhD students must have a signed research practicum agreement with the faculty member they will be working with. This is a required practicum.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
OL TBD TBD
Michelle Putnam
TBD
TBD

Social Work Online

SWO 403 - Social Policy and Social Work in Organizations and Communities

This course focuses on the context of macro social work, defined as policy practice, community practice, and organizational administration and management. This course will familiarize students with each of these practice environments by grounding them in the relevant historical and contemporary background of social work and social welfare policy, and then focusing on the theoretical frameworks and evidence-informed practice models for organizational and community engagement, assessment, and intervention. This course will underscore the responsibility that social workers have to understand and address the systemic factors that create circumstances of social, economic, and environmental injustice, with specific attention to the complexity of practice contexts and the influence of power and privilege on human rights. Students will learn strategies for social work at the macro level (i.e., policy, communities, and organizations) to influence, formulate, and advocate for social change related to social injustices based upon, but not exclusive to, race, ethnicity, language, class, religion, gender identity, sexuality, ability, citizenship status, age, and nationality. Throughout the course, examples will be drawn from local, national, and international contexts.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Anna Williams
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Dorrance Kennedy
3
TBD
OL2 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Dorrance Kennedy
3
TBD

SWO 404 - Social Welfare Policy

This 3 credit course builds upon SWO 403 Macro Practice: Social Policy and Social Work Organizations and Communities. Students will learn about current federal, state, and local policies related to a range of social welfare concerns (e.g., poverty reduction, health, housing/homelessness, criminal justice, disability, aging, child welfare, transportation), the evolution of these policies, and the socio-political and economic environment that has influenced their development, implementation, and evaluation. To appreciate the complexities, contradictions, strengths, and weaknesses of the U.S. approach to social welfare, students will make connections about the role of economics, politics, ideologies, values, and alternate policy models in each of these areas. The roles of power and privilege in social welfare policy will be assessed as they pertain to race, ethnicity, language, class, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, citizenship status, age, nationality, and indigenous status. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze social welfare policies, evaluate public budgeting for policies and programs, understand the role of the judiciary branch in the policy process, and assess the implementation of policies and the evaluation of their effectiveness. Class discussion, readings, and assignments will underscore the inextricable relationship between clinical social work practice and social welfare policy and practice. Students will consider how to incorporate policy work and advocacy into their own social work practice.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 2022/07/17 - 2022/10/16
Sunday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Amelia Mahan
3
TBD
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Patrick Shannon
3
TBD
02 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Amber Hewitt
3
TBD
002 2022/07/12 - 2022/10/11
Tuesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Julie Balasalle
3
TBD
02OL 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Amber Hewitt
3
TBD
03 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Katherine Leith
3
TBD
04 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
8:00AM - 9:30AM
Dorrance Kennedy
3
TBD
OL1 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Patrick Shannon
3
TBD
OL3 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Katherine Leith
3
TBD
OL4 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
8:00AM - 9:30AM
Dorrance Kennedy
3
TBD

SWO 409 - Dynamics of Racism & Oppression

Since its inception, the social work profession has been committed to developing health and human services that promote diversity and alleviate and/or eliminate social oppression and injustice. Rooted in the ecological perspective, social workers are aware of and can identify large social structures and processes that can negatively impact the well-being of communities and individuals. This 3-credit course is an intensive examination of how racism meets at the intersection of other dynamics of oppression to shape our and our clients experiences as we work together. The selection of the oppression of racism as a primary focus for the course is deliberate. Through the analysis of critical race theory and intersectionality, students will come to understand the reasoning for this emphasis. The course begins with conceptualizing race as a social construct and racism as a system that exists on multiple domains. From there, using an intersectional approach, we will examine the research focusing on how people develop racial identities in the face of racism, and how our racial identities position us to do our work. While thinking about how to disrupt racism in key sectors, such as the health professions and schools, we will then focus on how to enact culturally responsive care at the micro, meso, and macro levels in ways that honor the expertise and strengths of BIPOC people and their communities.The course is designed to stimulate critical thinking, help us critically reflect on our positionalities, and develop systematic critical analyses that lead to identifying ways that social workers can intervene and oppose oppression professionally and personally.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Katrina Huff-Larmond
3
TBD
001 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Taralyn Keese
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
2:45PM - 4:15PM
Carly Burton
3
TBD
002 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Tfawa Haynes
3
TBD
03 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Keesha Miller
3
TBD
04 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Taralyn Keese
3
TBD
OL2 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
2:45PM - 4:15PM
Carly Burton
3
TBD

SWO 411 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment

Human behavior in the Social Environment addresses two areas of focus. One is an ecological-developmental approach to human behavior in the social environment, taking a social constructionist perspective, emphasizing the ways in which culture (of large groups and small) and the broader social environment shape human behavior and identity. Concepts of resilience and resistance to oppression are emphasized using frameworks such as empowerment theories, systems theory and human ecology. This 3 credit course emphasizes micro, meso, and macro level social systems that influence individual behavior, including families, groups, organizations and communities, as well as the larger society with historical and cultural contexts. Particular attention is paid to culture, race, class, gender and sexual orientation as dynamic social constructions that can be sources of both oppression and strength at all levels of social systems. The second area of focus is on current theoretical frameworks to understand the bio-psycho-social-cultural processes that shape human behavior and development of self across the life span. We emphasize the interaction of individuals with their environments as they mutually influence each other, emphasizing cultural diversity and social justice. The application of multiple theoretical perspectives to Social Work practice is emphasized.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Amelia Finney
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:30AM - 10:00AM
Monique Holsey-Hyman
3
TBD
03 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Marie Jenkins
3
TBD

SWO 414 - Assessment & Diagnosis

In this one semester 3 credit course students learn to assess psychiatric diagnoses described in the DSM-5, considering those diagnoses and compounding psychosocial challenges from multi-theoretical lenses. Throughout the course there is a central focus on issues of social justice and oppression, and the interrelationship between biological, psychological, and social/cultural systems that impact diagnosis and treatment. Treatments connected to diagnoses are noted briefly. Students will be able to comprehensively assess, diagnose, and write bio-psychosocial assessments of their clients that convey the social justice lens of social work. Teaching techniques may include didactic presentations, guest presenters, videos, class discussions, and practice exercises.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 2022/07/12 - 2022/10/11
Tuesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Roger Sherman
3
TBD
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Zach Gittings
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00AM - 9:30AM
Roger Sherman
3
TBD
002 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Brian Wright
3
TBD
03 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Lavita Crutcher Green
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
10:30AM - 12:00PM
Julia Burns
3
TBD
05 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Indira Harris
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Folusho Otuyelu
3
TBD
08 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Indira Harris
3
TBD
09 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
9:30AM - 11:00AM
Roger Sherman
3
TBD
OL1 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Zach Gittings
3
TBD

SWO 418 - Crisis Intervention with Children and Adolescents

This 3 credit course examines crisis intervention and treatment approaches for children and adolescents, with a particular emphasis on vulnerable populations. Since crisis intervention is an integral part of social work practice, this course aims to provide students with knowledge of contributing factors, theories, and practice models that best inform crisis intervention in social work with children and adolescents. Students will use a systems-based framework in their analysis of crisis situations and become familiar with the skills necessary to implement effective techniques with children and adolescents. The course will provide students with the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills when working with crises, as well as examine policy issues, ethical issues, and the intersectionality of oppression and the implications of oppression and discrimination on crisis experiences and interventions. Furthermore, students will develop an awareness of the importance of engaging in self-care practices that will support their well-being when working with people in crisis.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
2:30PM - 4:00PM
Hannah Jones-Lewis
3
TBD
001 2022/07/14 - 2022/10/13
Thursday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Hannah Jones-Lewis
3
TBD
02 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Sasha Frinzl
3
TBD
03 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
10:00AM - 11:30AM
Melissa Mason
3
TBD
04 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Leah Sherman
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Leah Manzella
3
TBD

SWO 421A - Social Work Practice I

This yearlong course will focus on the action, reflection, and skills of generalist social work practice. We will consider the basic processes of social work practice: engagement, assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation, and termination, and their application to a wide range of issues and problems. We will look at various levels of intervention (intrapsychically, interpersonally, and intersystemically), various practice settings, social work practice roles, and theoretical perspectives. (3 credits per semester) In the first semester, particular attention is given to the multidimensional approach to assessment and intervention, interviewing skills and the development of the professional identity of the social worker, and the professional relationship with client(s)/client systems. Generalist social work practice is rooted in the ecological/ecosystems framework. Theories of empowerment and strengths-based perspectives are emphasized. Social work practice as framed and contextualized by professional codes of ethics, legal precedence, agency and organizational dynamics, neighborhoods, and communities will be studied and analyzed. While all sections of the course share a common outline for the syllabus, books, readings, and written assignments, each professor will shape their section to meet the specific needs of the classroom. Instructors will use a variety of mini-lectures, role-play, case presentations, process recordings, videos, and standardized cases to demonstrate different models and see the ways that different social and behavioral theories lead to particular ways of intervening. Given the changing demographics of U.S. society, there is a particular emphasis on cross-cultural understanding and on work with clients across the age spectrum.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Jennifer McCracken Dugan
3
TBD
001 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Shaina Gonzales
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Katie McCoy
3
TBD
03 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:00AM - 9:30AM
Andridia Mapson
3
TBD

SWO 421B - Social Work Practice II

The second semester of this yearlong 3 credit course will carry forward the ecosystems perspective from the first semester and will introduce students to four main practice theories: psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, narrative, and solution focused. Within each framework, we will examine core principles and begin to explore implications for each phase of the helping process: engagement, assessment, planning, evaluation, and termination. Drawing upon these theoretical frameworks as an organizing framework for thinking about generalist social work practice, the course proceeds to explore work with individuals, families, and communities in various contexts and circumstances. Students will deepen their assessment skills and their intervention skills at micro, mezzo, and macro levels. An emphasis will be placed on collaborative consultation of student case presentations as one way of conceptualizing the work and thinking from multiple perspectives about intervention strategies. We will explore the use of evidence-based (or informed) practice. Ways of evaluating practice and using the professional literature as an aid to practice choices will also be discussed.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Katie McCoy
3
TBD
001 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Shaina Gonzales
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Sasha Frinzl
3
TBD
002 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Shaina Gonzales
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
10:30PM - 11:59PM
Jarbriel Bryant
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
5:00PM - 6:30PM
Angela Hughes
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:00AM - 9:30AM
Katie McCoy
3
TBD
06 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Lauren Fallon
3
TBD
OL2 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Sasha Frinzl
3
TBD

SWO 422 - Substance Use and Social Work

Social workers across all sectors of practice are faced with individuals, families, and communities that are significantly affected by substance use disorders. The focus of the class is on exploring the nature, etiology, and treatment of substance use disorders and how they relate to social work practice. Set within a social justice framework, students critically analyze the intersections of substance use with racism and other forms of oppression. Ethical and legal frameworks for substance use treatment are identified and analyzed. Students explore the complex interactions of biological, psychological, and social causes and consequences of substance use, and learn how to develop a comprehensive, multidimensional biopsychosocial assessment. This 3 credit course prepares students to develop knowledge of, and skills in, evidence-informed substance use prevention, education, and treatment with individuals, groups, families, organizations, and communities.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Linda Kingery
3
TBD
001 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Melissa Brown
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Linda Kingery
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
11:30AM - 1:00PM
Meri Stiles
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Ashley Jackson
3
TBD
05 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Melissa Brown
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Ashley Jackson
3
TBD
07 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
10:00AM - 11:30AM
Megan Raymond
3
TBD

SWO 424A - Advanced Clinical Practice I

Building on knowledge and skills mastered from the foundation practice course, this 3 credit course is organized to expand and deepen students practice understanding and skills using a framework that incorporates the following learning goals:Students will be able to understand, interpret, and organize appropriate clinical data using the major social work paradigms (ecological, social justice, cultural responsiveness, ethics, and use of evidence).Students will demonstrate an ability to collect, appraise, and organize appropriate clinical data executing the social work process (engagement, assessment, formulation, goal setting, intervention, and evaluation).Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze, compare, contrast, interpret, and apply major social work practice approaches (psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, solution-focused and narrative) to appropriate clinical data from their internships and to their classroom colleagues clients.Students will be able to assess and interpret specific client challenges demonstrating knowledge of course themes related to professional use of self, the therapeutic relationship, assessment skills, and brief treatment.Prerequisite: SWO 421B

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Renee Rawcliffe
3
TBD
001 2022/07/17 - 2022/10/16
Sunday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Melissa Russiano
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
3:00PM - 4:30PM
Megan Raymond
3
TBD
002 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Nadia Jeudy-Pierre
3
TBD
03 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Allah-Fard Sharrieff
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:30AM - 10:00AM
Angela Hughes
3
TBD
05 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Binta Alleyne-Green
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Jennifer Brennan
3
TBD
07 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
10:00PM - 11:30PM
Allah-Fard Sharrieff
3
TBD
08 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Valerie Quarles
3
TBD
09 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
11:00AM - 12:30PM
Erin Benner
3
TBD

SWO 424B - Advanced Clinical Practice II

In this advanced 3 credit course, students combine theoretical knowledge and insights with evidence-based strategies for specific populations. Each practice approach reflects different ways of gathering, organizing, and reflecting on pertinent information and leads to distinct ways of conceptualizing issues and co-constructing clinical processes with clients. Students learn to identify which practice method or intervention is most beneficial for each specific client in achieving positive outcomes. Specific populations will be considered in this course, including children and adolescents, families, older adults, and sexual and gender minorities. The course focuses on deepening your knowledge and advanced clinical skills working with these populations. As this is a course that focuses on clinical practice, the aim is to include a significant amount of demonstration, role-play, and expert insight across the asynchronous and synchronous learning. 

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Krishna Bolling
3
TBD
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Dana Harrison
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Binta Alleyne-Green
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:30AM - 10:00AM
Jennifer Grant
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Shaina Gonzales
3
TBD
06 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Angela Hughes
3
TBD
07 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
11:00AM - 12:30PM
Jennifer Brennan
3
TBD
OL2 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Binta Alleyne-Green
3
TBD
OL3 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:30AM - 10:00AM
Jennifer Grant
3
TBD

SWO 425 - Family Approaches

This 3 credit course focuses on advanced ways to conceptualize, assess, and intervene in families. Modern and postmodern theories will be examined, practiced, and critiqued. Practice examples will include nontraditional and traditional families, and applications of family and systems theories to work with individuals and dyads will additionally be discussed. Developing ones own clinical voice and attending to ethnicity, class, and other social identities will be emphasized. Students are encouraged to bring case materials and to take full advantage of varied experiential learning techniques.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Nina Johnston
3
TBD

SWO 441 - Social Work Research

This 3 credit course introduces the fundamental principles of social work research, stressing the link between research and practice. Students will develop their critical thought regarding ethical considerations in research and will learn to design a research project. Also, students will learn to be critical consumers of research and professional literature, with a focus on the specialized interests and needs of individuals, families, and communities served through social work practice and allied professions. Students will develop an understanding of how statistics are used in research. Readings and class discussions will present principles of evidence-based or evidence-informed practice. Emphasis will be placed on the application of research to the practice of social work in micro and macro settings.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Jeff Steen
3
TBD
001 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Katherine Leith
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Iona Thraen
3
TBD
002 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Samantha Schneider
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Iona Thraen
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Megan Urbanski
3
TBD
OL4 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Megan Urbanski
3
TBD

SWO 446B - Field Education I

Generalist Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the generalist curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical skills with individuals, families, and groups, students will learn the varied roles and skills used by social workers at the agency and community level. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through field instruction, process recordings, and required written assignments.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Ellen Penta
4
TBD
001 TBD TBD
Nora Drane
4
TBD
02 TBD TBD
Emily Mitchell
4
TBD
002 TBD TBD
Elana Sandler
4
TBD
03 TBD TBD
Vanessa Norris
4
TBD
04 TBD TBD
Aisha Walters
4
TBD
05 TBD TBD
Jemima Anglade
4
TBD
06 TBD TBD
Elizabeth Egan
4
TBD
07 TBD TBD
Tamika Finch-Hall
4
TBD

SWO 446X - Simulated Field Experience

The Simulated Field Experience (SFX), a 14-week, three credit course that constitutes the first term of the generalist field placement. The SFX involves weekly asynchronous content, live sessions, and select assignments designed to prepare students for the field placement. This course creates a learning lab guided by a strengths-based, anti-oppressive practice approach where students apply social work values, ethics, knowledge, and skills to simulated interactions with standardized client-actors, role plays, and practice scenarios. Accordingly, the course provides an opportunity for students to build social work competencies and to prepare for practice-based learning grounded in the exploration of affective and cognitive processes including self-reflection and self-regulation, critical thinking, and cultural humility. In addition, students are exposed to a generalist social work process, evidence-based modalities, ethical decision-making, risk assessment, and working in interprofessional teams. Agency and larger system contexts for services, as well as the impact of social and economic policy on agencies and clinical practice, will be woven throughout the course. Throughout the course, students practice use of field education learning methods, including a competency-based learning plan and evaluation, process recording, and other reflective practice tools. In addition, students are introduced to the purpose and practice of supervision, as well as field education expectations. After successful completion of the course, students enter the three-term agency-based placement, which comprises the final term of the generalist placement and both terms of the specialized placement.Simulation training is an evidence-based teaching and learning pedagogy and an essential method for applying knowledge to practice. It provides the highest level of experiential learning while retaining the safety of working with actors, instructors, and peers rather than actual clients. Importantly, simulation offers a unique opportunity for observed practice and learning in a supportive environment where students will benefit from instructor guidance, peer support, and engage in reflective practice for application to future practice. Scholarly research indicates that students who engage in simulation practice increase their knowledge, skills, and confidence as practitioners. 

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/18
Tuesday, Thursday
7:00PM - 9:00PM
Lisa Kerzner-Sirois
3
TBD
001 2022/07/12 - 2022/10/13
Tuesday, Thursday
7:00PM - 9:00PM
Maura Gaswirth
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/18
Tuesday, Thursday
7:00PM - 9:00PM
Molly Wagner
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/18
Tuesday, Thursday
7:00PM - 9:00PM
Emily Mitchell
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/18
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00AM - 12:00PM
Amy Skeen
3
TBD
05 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/18
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00AM - 12:00PM
Anna Shustack
3
TBD

SWO 447A - Field Education II

Specialized Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the specialist level curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical practice skills with individuals, families, and groups, students learn organizational level social work skills. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through instruction, process recordings and required written assignments.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 TBD TBD
Kelley Cook
4
TBD
01 TBD TBD
Becky Dodson
4
TBD
02 TBD TBD
Dana Harrison
4
TBD
002 TBD TBD
Lauren Fallon
4
TBD
03 TBD TBD
Renee Lubowich
4
TBD
04 TBD TBD
Jacoba Rock
4
TBD
05 TBD TBD
Henrietta Lindsay
4
TBD
06 TBD TBD
PANTEA RAHIMIAN
4
TBD
07 TBD TBD
Penny Carroll
4
TBD
08 TBD TBD
Maria Sierra-Ortiz
4
TBD
09 TBD TBD
Jennifer Grant
4
TBD
10 TBD TBD
LaTanya Robinson
4
TBD

SWO 447B - Field Education II

Specialized Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the specialist level curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical practice skills with individuals, families, and groups, students learn organizational level social work skills. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through instruction, process recordings and required written assignments.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Jennifer Hannett
4
TBD
001 TBD TBD
Kayley Walsh
4
TBD
02 TBD TBD
Tanya Barker
4
TBD
03 TBD TBD
Ginny Hughes
4
TBD
04 TBD TBD
Vee Williams
4
TBD
05 TBD TBD
Henrietta Lindsay
4
TBD
06 TBD TBD
Daniel Baslock
4
TBD
07 TBD TBD
C. Melissa Ryan
4
TBD

SWO 455 - Human Sexuality and Social Work Practice

Sexuality is an essential component of the human experience. Exploring our attitudes and belief systems about human sexuality, and how they are informed by our social location, is important so that we can be self-aware and mindful in how we engage in conversations with our clients about their sexuality, gender identity, and social location. This 3 credit course presents a multifaceted overview of the challenges, concerns, and attitudes about human sexuality"how it evolves over the lifespan and is directly informed by social, familial, and political contexts. Regardless of client population or method of practice, all social workers will be required to address sex and sexuality with clients and will need to understand best practices as well as when and how to put personal values aside and be present for the client with a curious and nonjudgmental stance. The course integrates macro, mezzo, and micro approaches to sex and sexuality, and explores the historical, political, and biological aspects of sex and sexuality, sexual health, safe sex education and prevention, violence, and trauma, and helps students develop clinical skills for practice with adolescents and adults across the life span. Ethical considerations will also be explored.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
9:30AM - 11:00AM
Christopher Solomon
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Christopher Solomon
3
TBD

SWO 461 - Best Practices in Group Work

Social group work began in the settlement houses of the Progressive Era (early 20th century). The objective of group work was to diminish the effects of poverty and racial or ethnic marginalization by creating stronger, more supportive community relationships. Through groups, clients can find kinship, empowerment, social connections, personal and political voice, and skills that enable them to engage in more meaningful relationships in their lives. This course prepares students to plan for, assess, facilitate and evaluate social work practice with groups. Students will develop an understanding of the developmental stages of groups, roles among group members, and the function of mutual aid.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Sharon Forese
3
TBD
001 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Lauren Fallon
3
TBD

SWO 472 - Evidence-Based Approaches to SW Practice

In this 3 credit course, students will gain relevant knowledge and practice skills in order to practice motivational interviewing and dialectical behavior therapy with diverse client populations in an array of settings. In the first half of the course, students will gain exposure to the spirit of motivational interviewing as both a philosophy about client engagement and an approach that is sensitive to and respectful of the clients ambivalence about change. They will learn how to ask questions and respond to clients in a way that is curious, reflective, supportive, and ultimately strives to promote client self-determination, well-being, and readiness for change. MI has been proven to be an effective approach for clients who struggle with substance use disorders and other addictive disorders, as well as suicidal ideation. In the second half of the course, students will focus on dialectical behavior therapy, which is a manualized curriculum developed by Marsha Linehan and teaches clients the skills that enable self-regulation of affect, and to consider how their own meaning making and perceptions impact their behaviors that inform their sense of self and relationship with others, and is used with clients in both individual and group settings. Students will also learn how to integrate MI and DBT as a combined intervention strategy when appropriate.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
10:00PM - 11:30PM
Bernard Showers
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
12:30PM - 2:00PM
Judith Ellman
3
TBD

SWO 475 - Narrative Approaches to Social Work

This 3 credit elective course will focus on acquisition of practice skills using a narrative therapeutic approach with individuals, families, groups, and communities. It aims at teaching a therapeutic process based on a belief in the power of the specific language or languages used and the value of multiple perspectives in helping people reach preferred outcomes and maintain relationships. The course builds on knowledge, skills, and values acquired in the foundation year to assist students in developing narrative practice approaches. It also examines the research and conceptual underpinnings of narrative therapy. The course will address issues of cultural diversity and narrative practice approaches with different populations and groups. Using experiential methods and exercises, the course will engage participants in practice skills that promote collaboration through stances of openness, accountability, respect for power of community, and the belief in client competence and reliance on clients own expertise. The course will pay attention to social problems on a micro and macro level. Students will be encouraged to observe and give feedback to one another. The course will be divided in three parts. In the first part, we will review theories and models of narrative therapy, the second part will address interventions and techniques of narrative practice, and the last part will attend to special populations and special issues. Special issues will include illness, disability, spirituality, abuse, eating disorders, the elderly, families and children, groups, organizations, and larger systems.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Amelia Finney
3
TBD
001 2022/07/14 - 2022/10/13
Thursday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Adrianna Taylor
3
TBD

SWO 483 - Cognitive Behavioral Approaches & Treatment

The object of this 3 credit course is to provide a working knowledge of the basic principles and specific techniques of a contemporary multimodal approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with consideration of its integration with other therapeutic approaches such as dialectic behavior therapy and mindfulness-based stress reduction. Issues presented include depression, anxiety, interpersonal relationships, phobias, psychosis, and working with children and adolescents.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Sonali Zoracki
3
TBD
001 2022/07/14 - 2022/10/13
Thursday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Courtney Taylor
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
4:30PM - 6:00PM
Chana Lockerman
3
TBD

SWO 486 - Essential Elements Tele-Health

This 3 credit course provides students with the foundation needed to understand the benefits and uses of telebehavioral health as well as the role of the telebehavioral health social worker. As more agencies and practices are providing online services, it is crucial for students to understand the role of technology, social work ethics, evidence-based practices, special populations and adaptations.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Jennifer Grant
3
TBD
001 2022/07/17 - 2022/10/16
Sunday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Matthew McCall
3
TBD

SWO 509 - Evaluation in Social Work Practice

This 3 credit course is designed to prepare students in the basic principles of program and practice evaluation and their application to social work practice in agency settings. Using both case examples and their agency settings as laboratories, students will learn major approaches to evaluation (needs assessment, process, and outcome) with attention to the value, tensions, and ambiguities related to adapting current evaluation models to agency requirements for evaluation.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Iona Thraen
3
TBD
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Whitney Irie
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Bila Louima
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Stacey Little
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Amanda Sutter
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Danelle Marable
3
TBD
06 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
9:30AM - 11:00AM
Joanna Almeida
3
TBD
OL2 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Bila Louima
3
TBD
OL3 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Stacey Little
3
TBD
OL4 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Amanda Sutter
3
TBD
OL5 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:30PM - 9:30PM
Danelle Marable
3
TBD

SWO 528A - Child and Adolescent Trauma

In this 3 credit course we will begin examining best practices for trauma treatment with children, adolescents and families.  Using the social work assessment process we will begin to use a phase oriented treatment paradigm to examine clinical applications of trauma treatment across various settings and client presentations.  Special attention will be given to the in vivo utilization or role plays to deepen and enhance our clinical skill set when working with diverse traumatized clients. Our clinical social work practice will focus on integrating the social work paradigms of engagement, assessment, practice and evaluation while incorporating methods of addressing social justice and client-centered policy engagement.The course will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the foundation year Human Behavior in the Social Environment and Practice courses.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Julia Colpitts
3
TBD
001 2022/07/17 - 2022/10/16
Sunday
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Julia Colpitts
3
TBD
03 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
12:45PM - 2:15PM
Hannah Jones-Lewis
3
TBD

SWO 528B - Lifespan of Trauma Treatment: Adults

This 3 credit course provides a current review of trauma-informed practices for adult survivors of complex trauma and trauma, as well as trauma-informed practice interventions designed to work with families that have experienced chronic stress and complex trauma. Clinical social work with traumatized individuals and families requires a flexible and informed skill set. This course provides an overview of current literature and empirical evidence relating to the treatment of complex trauma in adulthood and family systems, with an emphasis placed on work with vulnerable and oppressed populations. Students will engage in live in vivo role-plays with trained actors several times throughout the semester so that they may enhance their clinical skills and gain greater mastery of intervention strategies. This course provides students with the opportunity to understand and engage in a variety of treatment approaches, as well as examine ethical issues, policy issues, and issues pertaining to social justice, and their relationship to trauma treatment.The course is the second semester of the Lifespan of Trauma Treatment course, and builds upon 528A: Lifespan of Trauma Treatment With Children and Adolescents. Additionally, the course builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in the foundation-year Human Behavior in the Social Environment and Practice courses.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Lindsey Spector
3
TBD
001 2022/07/11 - 2022/10/10
Monday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Chana Lockerman
3
TBD
02 2022/05/20 - 2022/08/19
Friday
12:30PM - 2:00PM
Chelsea Reddin
3
TBD

SWO 578 - Perspectives Severe Mental Ill

This 3 credit course is designed to increase interest in working with, and sensitivity to, those with severe mental illness and their families. We will explore the question of what constitutes mental illness, evaluate historical explanations, and address the implication of stigma associated with the illnesses. Various theoretical and treatment models will be presented including psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral understandings, psychoeducational, and empowerment perspectives. First-hand experiences of both those with the illnesses and their families will be highlighted through readings, film, and guest speakers. Specific treatment modalities will also be a focus of our work. Students are expected to bring in material from their work for discussion.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Michell Herring
3
TBD
001 2022/07/14 - 2022/10/13
Thursday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Michell Herring
3
TBD
02 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Michell Herring
3
TBD

SWO 582 - Attachment, Neurobiology, and Social Work Practice

This 3 credit course introduces students to the theory of attachment, covering areas such as patterns of attachment across the life span, relevant development theories, challenges of adolescence, adult attachment styles and relationships, how different attachment issues may manifest at different stages of life, and practical implications of attachment for conducting clinical therapy sessions. The neurobiology of attachment, the implications for attachment in trauma recovery, and the development of psychopathology from an attachment and neurobiological perspective are explored. Special attention is paid to the early life experiences including preverbal life experiences, adverse experiences of childhood, and the impact of abuse and neglect in childhood. This course explores clinical applications and usefulness of case conceptualization from an attachment and neurobiological aspect. Evidence-based approaches are utilized as the foundation for our exploration of clinical applications.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
001 2022/07/13 - 2022/10/12
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Greta Spoering
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Maruka Rivers
3
TBD
03 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
2:30PM - 4:00PM
Alyssa Wermers
3
TBD

SWO 596 - Field Educ. Advanced Standing

Advanced Standing Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the specialist level curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical practice skills with individuals, families, and groups, students learn organizational level social work skills. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through instruction, process recordings and required written assignments. The course also includes asynchronous content to be reviewed on 2SW, and six live-session classes held during the term.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Kelly Exley-Smith
5
TBD

SWO 597 - Field Educ. ADV Standing II

Advanced Standing Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the generalist curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical skills with individuals, families, and groups, students will learn the varied roles and skills used by social workers at the agency and community level. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through field instruction, process recordings, and required written assignments.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Kelly Exley-Smith
4
TBD

SWO 598 - Field Educ. ADV Standing III

Advanced Standing Field Education is an agency-based course in which students apply, in supervised practice, the theoretical concepts, principles, values, and ethics taught in the generalist curriculum. In addition to the supervised learning of clinical skills with individuals, families, and groups, students will learn the varied roles and skills used by social workers at the agency and community level. Case based learning is deepened and amplified through field instruction, process recordings, and required written assignments.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 TBD TBD
Becky Dodson
4
TBD
02 TBD TBD
Elana Sandler
4
TBD

SWO 701 - Transformation, Inspiration, and Inclusion: Social Work Leadership for the Future

The required course supports students in their ongoing leadership development. As the first leadership course in the DSW, it sets the foundation for developing skills to prepare students for leadership roles.  This course acknowledges the range of leadership experiences DSW students bring to the program and the potential to expand leader-manager roles following program completion. The course covers a variety of leadership theories and perspectives, challenging students to develop and assess their own leadership style, with a particular emphasis on inclusive leadership.  Building on the work of Simmons University Institute for Inclusive Leadership, the course puts significant attention on leadership values of diversity, equity, respect, cultural intelligence, and collaboration.  Inclusive leadership has these values at its core.  Specific skills of leadership, including assessment, communication, human capital development, decision-making, and collaboration are explored.  The course culminates with a focus on leadership for the future, exploring innovation, technology, and change.  Throughout the course, students are required to apply course materials to practice situations and develop strategies for social work leadership.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
5:45PM - 7:15PM
Tina Atherall
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Mary Semerod
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Stephanie Berzin
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Nicole Schneider
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
JENNIE SUCILSKY
3
TBD

SWO 702 - The Inner Life of the Adult Learner: Introduction to Theory and Practice

There is more to teaching than the transmission of information from one human being to another. Teaching is about building a culture of trust, a relationship that supports intellectual growth through shared purpose and mutual aid, and a willingness to take risk and be uncomfortable. Each individual learner brings unique life experiences, preferences, and a mindset to their learning.  The instructors role is to understand how human beings learn and then work with their students to create an environment that will enable them to feel supported, visible, and respected- a learning environment in which they can thrive and experience the transformation that can occur when learning occurs in context with others. We will begin this course by imagining the inner life of the adult learner as we examine social learning theory, cognitive and metacognitive science, contemplative practices, the interconnectedness between emotions and knowledge acquisition and retention, and other diverse approaches to student engagement.  As we consider different frameworks for understanding adult learning, we will explore the impediments and barriers to learning that result from complex trauma, poverty, oppression, and most notably, racism.  These experiences can greatly impact a learners ability to learn and to feel like a contributing and valued member of a learning community. As social work educators, we frequently  teach learners who are living with many of the exigencies that affect their clients.The second half of this course focuses on the principles and practices of contemporary approaches to teaching that emphasize the learners agency and voice, and the importance of making course content relevant, interactive, experiential, and applicable to learners as human beings and professionals.  Throughout the course we will deconstruct the impact of structural racism on higher education, and on our students sense of belonging within the classroom and to the programs and institutions in which they are enrolled.  These themes will be threaded throughout all of the course curriculum and learning activities.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Karen Hinton- Polite
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Walt Paquin
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Walt Paquin
3
TBD

SWO 703 - Seminar in Ethics & Social Justice

This seminar is grounded in the NASW Code of Ethics, which suggests that all actions that social workers take have ethical implications and consequences and that social justice considerations, in particular, must be weighed with every action. Through examination of ethics literature, public records of ethical violations, class discussions, and case-based learning, students will develop knowledge and skill in using an anti-racist, ethics-informed approach to decision making and taking action in the core areas of the DSW program: practice, teaching, and leadership.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Folusho Otuyelu
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Frank McAlpin
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Jennifer Meade
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Jennifer Jewell
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Christine Rogerson
3
TBD
06 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Folusho Otuyelu
3
TBD

SWO 704 - Deconstruction and Development of Clinical Social Work Knowledge and Practice

This course will examine how professional social work knowledge evolves in the context of broader intellectual currents in philosophy and the social sciences, including debates in epistemology, ontology, and political and moral philosophy. Traditional and postmodern theories will be examined and deconstructed in relation to clinical practice with vulnerable populations traditionally served by social workers. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing a diversity, equity, inclusion, power, and antiracist (DEIPAR) framework to critically review perspective, particularly in relation to each other and their clinical utility and limitations when applied to vulnerable populations.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Kendra Flores-Carter
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Jeffrey Inada
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Diana Franco
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Anna Morgan-Mullane
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Amy Mayes
3
TBD

SWO 705 - Power, Passion & Social Change

This course is designed to prepare students for diverse roles in organizational leadership with a focus on shifting institutional culture, creating social change, and advancing anti-racist policies and practices. Students will deepen their knowledge of organizational theories and concepts of power, privilege, and oppression within institutional frameworks. Students will develop strategies for effective change leadership"including organizational assessment and analysis, adaptive solution finding, and leveraging of their own vantage points and positionality within an organization.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Tiffany Llewellyn
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Catina O'Leary
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Robin Johnson
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Robin Johnson
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Tiffany Llewellyn
3
TBD

SWO 706 - Theories to Advance Practice

This course is designed to deepen students understanding of theories inclusive of theories previously explored in Practice 1, that advance practice using DEIP & anti-racist (DEIPAR) lenses to help understand the relevance and supporting science of incorporating theories of historical and generational trauma. Theories of institutional, structural and individualized oppression will be discussed in the context of increasing awareness regarding: personal benefit of members of the dominant society from historical dehumanization of others, the impact of internalized and accommodated dehumanization in non-dominant and dominant societal members, personal and corporate responsibility for creating the conditions of dehumanization; how culture creates and recreates dehumanization and acceptance of dehumanization; ethical implications of being complicit in dehumanization; and the role of resistance to rejection in the struggle to use DEIPAR frameworks.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Betina Wofford-Gilmore
3
TBD
02 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Aisha Mitchell
3
TBD
03 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Aisha Mitchell
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Amanda Baranski
3
TBD
05 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Ann Sullivan
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Anthony Nicotera
3
TBD
07 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Amanda Baranski
3
TBD
08 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Anthony Nicotera
3
TBD

SWO 707 - The Research-Informed Practitioner

This course focuses on developing students knowledge of research methods to evaluate and utilize evidence for practice in clinical settings. Students will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods such that students are able to read and critique published research and determine the implications for evidence-based and evidence-informed practices with a particular focus on underserved and underrepresented populations. Students will also examine these methods for implementing practice evaluations for evidence-based and evidence-informed practice.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Jaymie Lorthridge
3
TBD
02 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Shauntina Sorrells
3
TBD
03 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Jeanna Jacobsen
3
TBD
04 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Raquel Ellis
3
TBD
05 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Vivian Jennings-Miller
3
TBD
06 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Raquel Ellis
3
TBD
07 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Jason Ostrander
3
TBD
08 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Jaymie Lorthridge
3
TBD

SWO 708 - The Fundamentals of Inclusive Course Design and Effective Instruction

This course provides DSW students with the foundation needed to develop and design a course from a Learner Centered and Anti-Racist Approach. The student will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and skill related to the creation of learning objectives, assessments, syllabi and other key elements of a course. In addition, DSW students will learn to design and execute a Learner Centered instructional plan, rooted in inclusive pedagogy. Strategies will be discussed for effective instruction and management of classroom dynamics.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Julia Burns
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:00PM - 10:30PM
Julia Burns
3
TBD

SWO 709 - Strategies for Decolonized Clinical Supervision & Management

This course is designed to focus the broader themes of the first leadership course into examination of social justice and anti-racist considerations in clinical program supervsion and management, including challenging oppressive workplace structures and building decolonized work climates and cultures. Discussions and coursework will address the range of internal program dynamics addressing diversity, equity and inclusion issues in clinical supervision, managing complaints and conflict.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
5:45PM - 7:15PM
Shakira Kennedy
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Catina O'Leary
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
9:30PM - 11:00PM
Shakira Kennedy
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Nathaniel Currie
3
TBD
05 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Nathaniel Currie
3
TBD

SWO 711 - Working with Complex & Diverse Populations

This course builds on SWO-704 Deconstruction and Development of Clinical Social Work Knowledge and Practice and SWO-706 Theories to Advance Practice content to examine clinical processes working with complex and diverse populations. Building on critical skills of inquiry and analysis of critical race theory and intersectionality, students will explore the impact of clinical processes when working with complex and diverse populations inclusive of but not limited to: intersubjectivity, therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference, containment, holding, the use of defenses, hope, and justice. The course will help students learn to apply tenets of radical social work and a decolonizing lens to explore processes of change toward a (re)imagined social work practice for complex and diverse populations. Using case material, students will interrogate the assumptions of theory, research and practice as they relate to working with complex and diverse populations. The course will challenge students toward skill and knowledge generation regarding conceptualization, critique, and analysis of culturally-informed formulation and in responsive working alliances with clients.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Leticia Cavazos
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
4:30PM - 6:00PM
Anna Morgan-Mullane
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
8:00PM - 9:30PM
Jeffrey Inada
3
TBD
04 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Diana Franco
3
TBD

SWO 712 - Interdisciplinary Social Work

This course focuses on the development of expert level knowledge, skills, and competencies in interdisciplinary social work practice. The aims of the course are to familiarize students with 1.) the application of varying models of interdisciplinary practice 2.) approaches to working with and across disciplines while centering the stakeholder within the experience and 3.) the skills necessary to assume leadership roles on interdisciplinary teams. Students explore the complex interactions of different disciplines while examining the impact of interdisciplinary practice on outcomes, satisfaction, and greater structural change in the context of social determinants of health. Students embrace the foundations of social work as a frame for interdisciplinary practice as anti-racist, anti-oppressive practitioners, educators, and leaders. The course content emphasizes critical thinking, peer discussion, demonstration, and case-based learning to enhance students conceptual and practice skills to not only participate in, but lead interdisciplinary teams. 

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
5:45PM - 7:15PM
Nicole Saint-Louis
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:30PM - 8:00PM
Stephanie Renno
3
TBD
03 2022/05/19 - 2022/08/18
Thursday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Cali Collin
3
TBD

SWO 713 - Adaptive Leadership: Implementing Leadership Through Social Justice Lens

This course will examine the nature of leadership adaptation in the context of the life-cycle of non-profit agencies. This course builds on content learned in prior leadership courses: SWO 701 Transformation, Inspiration, and Inclusion, and SWO 705 Power, Passion, and Social Change. The course will frame the knowledge and comprehension of adaptive leadership using the Judith Simon model of the five stages of the agency life-cycle. Students will engage in grouped discussion of this framed progression model to build contextual understanding of theories of power and social justice concerns regarding adaptive leadership. The class will explore tensions and ambiguities of leadership, as well as personal and public resistances to DEIPAR (diversity, equity, inclusion, power, anti-racist) considerations. At this stage, there is an emphasis on collaborative learning where students engage in the development and application of concepts relating to adaptive leadership found in readings and real world examples. Students will collaboratively synthesize and apply their emerging leadership in the area around which they are developing their expertise (their Capstone projects), using adaptive and socially just (DEIPAR) leadership lenses. Class discussions unfold using workshop style discussions to facilitate student application of ideas in new ways and/or in new contexts.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/22 - 2022/08/21
Sunday
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Tina Atherall
3
TBD
02 2022/05/16 - 2022/08/15
Monday
6:00PM - 7:30PM
Betina Wofford-Gilmore
3
TBD
03 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Leticia Cavazos
3
TBD
04 2022/05/18 - 2022/08/17
Wednesday
8:30PM - 10:00PM
Vivian Jennings-Miller
3
TBD

SWO 714 - Integrative Seminar

This is a process intensive course toward degree completion. Students will work with course faculty to refine their Proposal and build toward oral defense of their Capstone proposal. This is done through a scaffolding process where the students first develop their comprehensive exam, then develop their literature review, and construct their proposal. In this course, students will integrate their learning and knowledge from previous curricular content. The first paper of this course is the comprehensive exam where students will demonstrate knowledge of comprehensive integration of the three pillars (teaching, leadership and practice) as it relates to their developing area of expertise (Capstone project), and the DEIPAR framework. Students who received a passing grade on this comprehensive exam can then begin work on their second paper, the Literature Review, which justifies the project being proposed. A passing grade on the Literature Review paves the way to develop the Capstone Proposal.  Students will work with course faculty to refine their Proposal and prepare for oral defense of their Capstone proposal.  Content creation and application of knowledge and skills are expected weekly throughout the term.

Section Section Dates Time Instructor Credits Location
01 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:30PM - 9:30PM
Vanessa Robinson-Dooley
3
TBD
02 2022/05/17 - 2022/08/16
Tuesday
6:30PM - 9:30PM
Jacqueline Dyer
3
TBD
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